Apr

22

2016

Saturday April 23rd Vendor List

Vendor List Saturday 4/23
Native to the Caucasus Mountain regions, sweet cherries were once wild cherries, developed into hardier, sweeter, and sometimes prettier varieties that we know today. In the U.S.
Nutritionally, this small, dark red fruit contains anthocyanin glycosides, which can relieve gout, arthritis, and fibromyalgia pain. The vitamin C, fiber, and carotenoids inhibit several types of cancers, and the cyanidin increases free radical scavenging activity. In comparison with sour cherries, sweet cherries could be called a completely different fruit, wildly popular for snacking or as an addition to fruit salads and confections.
Guess what’s back this week?

sweet cherries

sweet cherries


Ranchers and Farmers
Armstrong Valley Farm
Bellwether Farm
Bernier Farms
Bohemian Farms
Earthworker
Farm Sinclair
Foggy River
Gourmet Farms
Hector’s Honey
La Vida Buena Nursery
Laguna Farm
Ma & Pa’s Garden
Marc Busalacchi Farms
Min Hee Gardens
Neve Rose
Offerings of the Land
OZ Farm
Parson’s Homegrown
Pepper Ranch
Ponce
Salmon Creek
Schletewitz Family Farm
Singing Frogs
Straus Family Creamery
Two Rock
Williamson Ranch
X-0ticals
Cooks and Crafts
Alma’s Oil Cloth
Aroma Floral
Barrel Art
Berkman’s Spice
Cacoco
Costeaux Bakery
DH Woodworks
Dominique Sweets
Edgeworks
Farm to Ferments
Four Directions Creative Art
Franco One World Sausage
Full Circle Bakery
Future Eats Juice Bar
Gaga Café
Hilltop Honey
Home Maid Ravioli
Hue de la Roque
I’m Sew Sure
Jeweler on Wheels
John Rizzi
Kristen’s Krafts
Leon Day
Mi Fiesta
Not Yer Momma’s Granola
One Ocean Seafood
Pop’s Kettle Corn
Princess Seafood
Pure Puer Tea
Raymond’s Bakery
Round Around Brew
Scott Wilson Pottery
Sia Baskets
Sonoma Garden Design
Stonehouse Olive Oil
The Garden Wild
The Hummus Guy
Threads of Time
Wine Country Chocolate
Chefs
Foodie Farmhouse
Lata Indian Cuisine
Sinful Fusion
Anello Crab & Seafood
Chalkhill Cookery

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Manager’s Pick
Right now it has to be the red and the yellow cherries! So juicy and tasty.

A perfect balance of sweet and tart, cherries are juicy and give a little snap when you bite into them, also delivering a dose of potassium, vitamin C and fiber. Though you may find tart or sour cherries in farmers’ markets, the most common varieties are sweet cherries, such as yellow Rainier and dark red Bing cherries

They have a short season. 10 ways to save some cherry goodness.

Ponce/EGB Farms and Busalacchi have cherries.

http://www.thekitchn.com/10-ways-to-preserve-cherries-172442

Photo: Manager's Pick
Right now it has to be the red and the yellow cherries!  So juicy and tasty.

A perfect balance of sweet and tart, cherries are juicy and give a little snap when you bite into them, also delivering a dose of potassium, vitamin C and fiber. Though you may find tart or sour cherries in farmers’ markets, the most common varieties are sweet cherries, such as yellow Rainier and dark red Bing cherries

 They have a short season.  10 ways to save some cherry goodness

http://www.thekitchn.com/10-ways-to-preserve-cherries-172442
Read More...

Michele Anna Jordan published a recipe that should be named Santa Rosa Farmers Market Roasted Duck.

Fresh cherries are at the market. Salmon Creek Ranch has the best duck. Jordan recommends a pinot noir wine with this dish. St. Rose Winery is at the market. You can find both fresh tarragon and dried tarragon at the market.

Roasted Duck with Cherries and Tarragon
Makes 4 servings
1 duck, about 4 pounds
—Kosher salt
—Black pepper in a mill
1/3 cup red wine
1/3 cup duck or chicken stock
2 small tarragon sprigs
¾ pound fresh cherries, pitted
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon minced fresh tarragon
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and set a heavy ridged pan in the oven.
Remove any fat in the cavity of the duck and reserve it for another use.
Use the tip of a sharp knife to pierce the skin of the duck all over the legs, thighs and breast.
Season the duck inside and out with salt and pepper.
Set the duck, breast side up, in the ridged pan and bake for 20 minutes. Open the oven and carefully turn the duck breast side down. Cook 20 minutes more.
Remove the pan from the oven and pour off as much fat as possible. Turn the duck breast side up and add the red wine, stock, tarragon and cherries to the pan.
Return to the oven and cook 20 minutes more.
Remove from the oven, cover the duck lightly with a sheet of aluminum foil and let rest 15 minutes.
To carve the duck, set it on a clean work surface and cut the the leg and thigh joints, reserving any juices that are released. Slice the breast. Arrange the duck on a platter.
Working quickly, set the pan over medium heat, add the butter and swirl until it is just melted. Remove from the heat, taste and correct for salt and pepper.
Remove and discard the tarragon sprigs, spoon the juices and cherries over the duck, sprinkle the minced tarragon on top and serve immediately.

Make it for Mom!

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