The Wednesday market
This week’s market offers wonderful choices for fruit and vegetables.including great tasting tomatoes grown less then 3 miles from Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

There are a few vendors who only come on Wednesday and you are missing out if you don’t come and meet them. You are missing agreat blue cheese and wine.

Wednesday Only Vendors *

Hector’s Honey dried garlic, onions, winter squash, tomatillos and of course honey

Farm Sinclair Lettuces, radishes and a variety of Asian greens usually picked the morning of the market,

Parsons’ Homegrown Yellow, red and red cherry tomatoes. Really tasty, grown locally

Armstrong Valley Farm Eggs, beets, carrots, greens. His carrots are legendary

Penny Royal Farm Wonderful cheeses – award winning cheeses
The blue is amazing.*

Navarro Vineyards Wine and juices made from wine grapes. The pinot noir is a favorite with children and adults.*

The Fruit Factory Citrus and yams this time of year. Great prices on bulk purchases

Ridgeview Farm Lettuces, radishes and other spring vegetables. Not only are they tasty but they are beautiful *

Dream Catcher Ranch Locally raised meat. Ask about their meat CSA*

The Green Grocer Great farm to table fare. Served on china. Treat yourself to some great Sonoma County eating They cook straight from the market

Edgework’s Sharpening Services Get a spring tune-up for your garden tools. Don’t forget to sign up for Art’s email reminder service

Franco’s One World Sausages – Simply the best sausages. Ask Dennis to recommend the perfect one for you. When it’s raining the next day, wouldn’t be great to have a nice plate of sausage and potatoes and whatever vegetable you prefer. Everything you need is at the Wednesday market.

Gaga Cafe You can’t take Gary’s smile home with you but you can get the same great coffee –take home a bag of beans!

Full Circle Bakery Wonderful breads good variety from sandwich to specialty bread. The perfect bread for your mid-winter BLT
everything you need for a great BLT is at the Wednesday market.

Honeymoon Ice Cream Seasonal flavors, locally produced from local organic milk. Package in returnable jars. Ice Cream sandwiches. Wednesday only. You have got to come and taste.

The Taste of Tea Come and as see what they are sampling. Ask about the tea and food pairings.

Mi Fiesta Catering Co. Whether it’s a party for one or more. Mi Fiesta is one stop shopping. Their tortillas make great wraps for any kind of filling.

Read More...

The Wednesday market is a wonderful place.  It’s got you covered from Sonoma grown fruit and vegetables.

But it also has a group of wonderful artisans.  Quillfully Yours beautiful cards and other accessories, Willow Design clever silver jewelry much crafted from silver ware, I’m Sew Sure has beautiful homegoods among them baby blankets. Alma’s Oil Cloth has original designs made in bright colorful oil cloth, Vick Kemp has napkins and beautiful shirts.  The Comfort Zone is at this Wednesday market with their pillow of all sizes designed to be heated or chilled to bring relief for your aches and pains.

Hectors Honey

Armstrong Valley Farm

EGB Farm

The Patch

Sebastopol Berry Farm

Min-Hee Hill Gardens

Penny Royal Farm

Ridgeview Farm

The Beet Generation

Leap Frog Greens

Farm Sinclair

McClellan Dairy

Village Charter School

 

Gaga Cafe

Comfort Zone

Quillfully Yours

Im Sew Sure

Willow Designs

Almas Oilcloths

Mi Fiesta Catering

Victoria Kemp

Waterhorse Ridge

Full Circle Bakery

Art Trails

Prepared Foods

Starting from Scratch

Penang Kitchen

Green Grocer

Read More...

Jul

23

2013

The Wednesday July 24th Vendor List

Zinnias Ridgeview Farm only at the Wednesday market

Zinnias Ridgeview Farm only at the Wednesday market

Hectors Honey

Armstrong Valley Farm

EGB Farm

The Patch

Sebastopol Berry Farm

Min-Hee Hill Gardens

Penny Royal Farm/Navarro Vineyards

Ridgeview Farm

Beet Generation Farm

Bohemian Wellbeing Farm

Leap Frog Greens

Dreamcatcher Ranch

Full Circle Bakery

Gaga Cafe

Waterhorse Ridge

My Comfort Zone

Viki Kemp

The Garden Wild

Cultural Element

Mi Fiesta Catering

Green Grocer

Penang Kitchen

 

Read More...


Radishes can be so much more than a garnish. Famous chefs are finding creative ways to use them. Spring is radish season although they are available through-out the year.
Ridgeview Farm has beautiful French breakfast radishes -named for their use sliced on buttered bread with a sprinkle of salt.

Michael Bauer, SF Chronicle Food critic on the radish “Most people don’t think of the typical radish as a vegetable. It’s repeatedly — and unfortunately — relegated to a garnish, but when it’s sauteed it enhances many dishes with its firm texture and spicy taste” Recipes and ideas

Ridgeview Farm is at the Wednesday market with beautiful radishes and lettuces and of course their seasonal bouquets.

Local Spicery has joined the Wednesday line-up. Fresh dried herbs and spices in the quantities you need.

Dreamcatcher Ranch produces meats from heritage breeds humanely raised.

The Wednesday market has the largest selection of Sonoma grown produce anywhere with the exception of the Saturday market.

Don’t forget our great food court – eat-in, take-out or pick something up for later.

This week Salmon Creek Ranch the Edgeworks knife sharpening are also at the Wednesday market.

Wednesday Vendor List

Local Spicery freshly milled in the quantities you need

GaGa Cafe coffee by the cup or bag

Willow Design Wonderful jewelry designs and clever uses of old silverware

The Garden Wild Handcrafted soaps many from ingredients found at the market

Full Circle Bakery Amazing breads straight from the bakery – the garlic cheese is so good you have to buy two loaves so you get home with one

Water Horse Ridge Jams and condiments all locally sourced combinations to make your toast sing

Comfort Zone Pillows and more that can be heated or cooled good for when you’ve over-done it.

Min-Hee Hill Gardens Lettuces of all kinds and many heirloom varieties of greens. Vegetable and herb starts including tomato plants

Armstrong Valley Farm Local citrus, asparagus, flowering kale and iceberg lettuce an eclectic mix of produce, fruit and eggs.

Hector’s Honey Honey and Bees Wax Products, eggs, garlic,potatoes, spaghetti squash, chili peppers

Bohemian Wellbeing Farm Mushrooms cultivated, foraged, fresh and dried

The Dreamcatcher Catcher Ranch Ask about their meat CSA especially their breakfast box

Green Grocer The food they make at the market is amazing did you know you can buy the cured pork products to take home

Penang Kitchen On Wednesday only they have potato curry. Don’t miss it. Seriously.

Mi Fiesta Still the best fast food! You can’t beat the tamale but for something a little more substantial and almost as fast – they have a single serving (generous) plate that is easy to heat. Proving you don’t have to give up taste for convenience.

Rdigeview Farm Beautiful seasonal flowers and wonderful seasonal fruit and vegetables

Parsons Homegrown the tastiest tomato you can get this time of year and grown less then three miles from Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Read More...

Wednesday April 17th — Parsons Homegrown is back at the Wednesday market. The first of our seasonal vendors Ridgeview Farm is now regularly at the Wednesday market.

Wednesday Vendor List
GaGa Cafe coffee by the cup or bag

Willow Design Wonderful jewelry designs and clever uses of old silverware

The Garden Wild Handcrafted soaps many from ingredients found at the market

Full Circle Bakery Amazing breads straight from the bakery – the garlic cheese is so good you have to buy two loaves so you get home with one

Water Horse Ridge Jams and condiments all locally sourced combinations to make your toast sing

Comfort Zone Pillows and more that can be heated or cooled good for when you’ve over-done it.

Min-Hee Hill Gardens Lettuces of all kinds and many heirloom varieties of greens. Vegetable and herb starts including tomato plants

Armstrong Valley Farm Local citrus, asparagus, flowering kale and iceberg lettuce an eclectic mix of produce, fruit and eggs.

Hector’s Honey Honey and Bees Wax Products, eggs, garlic,potatoes, spaghetti squash, chili peppers

Bohemian Wellbeing Farm Mushrooms cultivated, foraged, fresh and dried

The Dreamcatcher Catcher Ranch Ask about their meat CSA especially their breakfast box

Green Grocer The food they make at the market is amazing did you know you can buy the cured pork products to take home

Penang Kitchen On Wednesday only they have potato curry. Don’t miss it. Seriously.

Mi Fiesta Still the best fast food! You can’t beat the tamale but for something a little more substantial and almost as fast – they have a single serving (generous) plate that is easy to heat. Proving you don’t have to give up taste for convenience.

Rdigeview Farm Beautiful seasonal flowers and wonderful seasonal fruit and vegetables

Parsons Homegrown the tastiest tomato you can get this time of year and grown less then three miles from Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Read More...

Mar

18

2013

Joel Kiff

photo from Sonoma West

photo from Sonoma West

The market welcomed back Ridgeview Farm on Saturday.  The beautiful displays of lettuces and seasonal bouquets are signs that spring is really here.

This year the return is tinged with sadness because of the announcement Joel Kiff died earlier in the week.  Joel Kiff was an integral part of the farmers markets community, including serving as this market’s president.

 

Late last year The Healdsburg Tribune published an interview with Joel and Renee Kiff.

NEIGHBORS

by Shonnie Brown | Posted: Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Joel and Renee Kiff

As I drive onto the glorious 3.6 acres of Ridgeview Farm off of Alexander Valley Road, I feel gratitude for our local farmers who continue to use this beautiful land in a way that is relevant to all of us. Boisterous greetings by CJ, a former rodeo dog, and Oliver, a gigantic black Lab and recent arrival from Minnesota, welcome me.

The interview unofficially begins as Renee takes me for a tour. In the backyard we are met by Posey the sheep with a bunch of bamboo in her mouth, and her blind buddy, Patrick, who’s been bottle-fed since day one. It’s quite a spread with hens and roosters, dogs and cats, family members in various houses and a vast array of fruits and veggies. Joel and Renee’s daughter, Sarah, is making wreathes of cut flowers from her splendid flower bed. There are fields of winter vegetables as well as summer fruit––melons, tomatoes, Asian pears, cling peaches and 80 varieties of apples. Renee tells me that half of their income comes from Panda’s Garden (Sarah’s flower business) and half from the row crops which Joel began planting when he retired from teaching. But let’s start at the beginning…

Joel hails from Ringling, Montana, where he was raised on a cattle ranch. While a student at Carroll College in Helena, he met Renee (who attended Seattle University) at a northwest Catholic College Conference. The two began a correspondence by mail, which culminated in a decision to marry. Renee, from Marin County, left college at the end of her junior year, and the two began married life in 1960 in Helena, Montana, where Joel began his career as a high school teacher and football and track coach.

After two years, they moved to the Bay Area. Joel taught first at Riordan High in San Francisco and also got a degree in math. The couple then moved to Marin County where they lived for 17 years, raising their five children while Joel loved teaching and coaching at Marin Catholic High School. The big change came in 1978 when the older boys were in their teens.

“Joel thought it was important for the boys to have chores like he did,” Renee tells me. “And after 18 years of teaching, he needed a change and Sarah wanted a horse.

“My sister-in-law, Nancy Tobener, and my brother Tim, now deceased, had moved here. Joel got to know the area while working as a carpenter for Tim during the summers. Our son, Dave, saw an ad for a place ‘with 3.6 acres, a barn, two fireplaces and a pool.’ Rick Cooper showed us this house and we moved here in 1978 when the bottom was falling out of the construction business… So Joel began teaching at Healdsburg High in 1980 and taught here for nearly 20 years.”

Renee walked into Healdsburg High with Joel Jr. and Martin, their two oldest. Dave was going into eighth, Sarah into sixth, and Tom was to begin kindergarten. The HHS registrar enrolled the two eldest in Rod Walstrum’s agriculture program. Renee now thanks the Ag program and her sons for teaching both her and Joel how to farm.

“All the kids except Tom became very active in 4-H and FFA. They raised many animals and even started a successful pig business. As each of them got older, Joel would turn more and more of the land over to farming. When we first started, we found two abandoned artichoke plants. I told the boys to divide them up with the shovel. They broke these huge things into separate pieces with roots and made rows and rows of perfect plants. Each of them took! And that’s how we got started.”

Renee began volunteering at Healdsburg Elementary––ending up as a long-term teacher’s aide in Tom’s class. She then worked as a secretary for Gary Thomson, Work Experience and Career Center Coordinator at HHS. When the career center was made separate, Renee began running that, having a satisfying career and being responsible for college scholarships for 10 years.

Joel and Renee were always vendors at the Farmers Market during the summers. In 1990, when their youngest son, Tom, graduated from HHS, Renee was asked to be the Healdsburg Farmers Market manager. She took ag classes with Paul Vossen and Leonard Diggs at SRJC and began her column on farming for the Healdsburg Tribune. Over the years, Ridgeview Farm has grown to include 13 colors of Sarah’s zinnias, rows of flower bulbs planted in large bins, plus beets, lettuce, garlic, onions, arugula and radishes.

“Paul Vossen asked us to be a test orchard for U.C.,” Renee recalls. “They set us up with two each of 63 varieties of apple trees which began bearing fruit in three years. U.C. monitored us for several years until the Sebastopol test site tilled their orchard under, thus ending the grant. But we grew all these apples until Joel got sick and they became too much to handle, and then we took down half of the trees.”

Renee tells me that all the winter crops (broccoli, cucumbers, lettuce, arugula, etc.) are all started from seed. In the greenhouse, she shows me how to plant a flat of vegetable seeds with loving care. She remarks that Ridgeview Farms is not special this way, but that all our local farmers take such care as they guide their food from seed to the consumer’s table. Renee sadly informs me that food raised in this manner is only reaching 1 percent of the population.

“This is what you’re supporting when you buy at our local Farmers Market,” Renee tells me. “We need this diversity for the health of the land, but for each of us it’s a personal decision as to where you put your dollar.”

I feel educated and informed by Renee as we begin winding down. When I ask her what else she would like to tell me, she wants to talk about Joel, who she holds personally responsible for gently pushing her into the modern era.

“I’m a stick-in-the mud,” she says. “Joel made a trip to Montana happen. He made seeing John Denver happen. I still can’t do computers. I can’t switch from DVD to TV. I would have remained in the dark ages, waiting for the phone operator to say, ‘Number, please…’ if not for Joel. He’s the one responsible for making so much in our life happen.”

Shonnie Brown is a local author and memoirist who is interested in fostering connections between people and their community. Shonnie writes personal and family histories through her business, Sonoma LifeStories, and is also a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. She can be reached by e-mail at shonnie@sonic.net or on the web at www.sonomalifestories.com.

About Joel by Michael Haran

After reading Shonnie Brown’s article about Joel and Renee Kiff I just have to comment on what Joel Kiff means to me. We moved to Healdsburg in September of 2006. I was helping out with the HFM annual pumpkin race when someone called my name. I turn to see an older gentleman who I didn’t recognize staring at me. I took a closer look and then said “Mr. Kiff?” He gave me a broad smile as I was coming out of my initial shock. It was not only fifty years since I had seen him how could he not only remember me but also recognize me after having taught hundreds, if not thousands, of students.

Joel Kiff was my algebra teacher and football/track coach at Marin Catholic High school from 1962 to 1965. I am the oldest boy in what was a very dysfunctional family of ten kids. Back then ADD was treated with corporal punishment and I became chubby using food to compensate for my lack of proper family support. I couldn’t even make the freshman basketball team I was so fat.

My grades were terrible and I was in danger of becoming one of the 36 boys in my class that either left the school or were kicked out. Most teachers didn’t have the time or inclination to work with marginal students. I remember Joel as one of the few teachers I had who would put in extra time with a failing student. I think it was more his calm demeanor and personal attention that had the biggest impact on me. Under his instruction the light went on and I “got it.” It was such a contrast from my family life and other teachers at the school.

Back in those days Catholic school football teams were hardly the juggernauts that they are today. We had 300 boys compared to the public school’s 1000. We consistently got trounced by the much bigger public schools. I remember Joel telling us that life isn’t necessarily about winning it’s about trying and the sheer joy of overcoming the odds against you. It made the game so much more fun for us even in losing. But you know what, we started winning a few games and it’s something I’ll never forget.

He talked to us about physical conditioning and how it was more than just getting in shape to play sports. He explained that good physical conditioning was important for a good life and that being in shape helps with the concentration you need to get good grades. To this day I can’t be sure that Joel’s attention, insights and kindness to me are what allowed me to go on and play for a USAF command basketball team or get a business degree from SSU but I think it was.

Joel and Renee have meant a lot to our Healdsburg community. Joel is in failing health now so whenever I see him I try to think of the high school experiences that we shared as student – teacher/coach and reminisce. If you know Joel you might want to send him a card. Thanks, Joel. This is what you mean to me.

Michael Haran is a Healdsburg resident.

DSC00022

 

 

 

Read More...

DSC00644

Not only is Mi Fiesta back this week, but also Ridgeview Farm.  Spring IS here.  Ridgeview welcomes Spring with beautiful radishes, lettuces and maybe some bouquets.

The knife sharpener will be here too.  Get your gardening tools shapened up!

If the warm weather has made you a little bit overly ambitious  check out the Comfort Zone for their pillow packs and massage balls.

 

Wednesday vendor list:

Hectors Honey

Min-Hee Hill Gardens

Armstrong Valley Farm

Bohemian Wellbeing Farm

Willow Designs

Full Circle Bakery

Comfort Zone

The Garden Wild

Water Horse Ridge

Green Grocer

Penang Kitchen

Mi Fiesta Catering

The Dreamcatcher Ranch

GaGa Café

Salmon Creek Ranch

Ridgeview Farm

Edgeworks Knife and tool sharpening

 

 

 

Read More...

 

 

If you are thinking oy vey it’s Wednesday.  Give yourself a treat.   Everything you need meat, eggs, vegetables, fruit, bread and some fun shopping too.   You can get a bite to eat, food to go and prepared foods.    Great coffee too!   If you are in a hurry or want to linger — this is the place.

Willow Designs  Clever jewelry , scarves, aprons a few with vegetable themes .  Her tiny vases made from old silverware were recently written up in the Press Democrat — the perfect item for holiday tables or for gifts
Water Horse Ridge Jams  “Jams of the God’s”  says  Bite Club an array of seasonal jams and condiments both sweet and savory
Gaga Café  The best cup of coffee plus beans (and advice)on brewing to go.
Full Circle Bakery Breads of all kinds plus a nice array of pastries     Don’t miss the garlic cheddar– better buy two so you still have one when you get home

Mi Fiesta  Tamales, enchiladas, salsas, rice,beans tortillas everything for a dinner you don’t have to fix and you can have a tamale on the spot!

Dream Catcher Beef, pork, goat  bacon in a number of styles including nitrate free

Bohemian Well-Being Town  Mushrooms all from the Occidental area.  Mr. Kim is a wealth of knowledge about both culinary and medicinal uses of mushrooms

Armstrong Valley Farm  Seasonal produce and eggs  Right now beautiful cauliflowers in colors!  If you are looking for sensationally colored vegetables for the upcoming holidays be sure and stop by — and of course they taste wonderful too.    Compare a supermarket carrot with a carrot from Armstrong Valley Farm and you will never buy a supermarket carrot again.

Ridgeview Farm Seasonal produce , fruit , and amazing long lasting bouquets.   Amazing zinnias in reds, yellows and gold are still in season.

DeSantis Bella Fruita  Seasonal fruit and other things you won’t see any place else. Currently they have raisins on the vine and uncured olives.  If you have ever thought about making your own olives — now’s your chance.

Min Hee Gardens  lovely lettuces and a variety of peppers sweet and hot and seasonal produce – beets, kale, cucumbers and they still have tomatoes

Twin Palms Ranch    Not just another array of vegetables that are beautiful to look at.  They have a wonderful variety of winter squashes.   Ask them about each variety and the taste  and the some suggestions for preparation.

Hector’s Honey   Honey of course but there is also seasonal produce.  Right now Hector has purple tomatillos and he is still  harvesting tomatoes

The Windsor Green Grocer  Fabulous breakfasts, lunch, brunch.  They also have cured pork products by the pound including the very bacon from their world famous blt.
The Patch   Green beans, fresh red and white onions, beautiful peppers  and tomatoes

Sebastopol Berry Farm  Raspberries still as sweet as summer.  Not too much longer.  Think about a cran-raspberry chutney for a twist this Thanksgiving.

The Patch   Seasonal produce including green beans, fresh red and white onions, peppers and tomatoes!

The Wednesday market pops up just when you need it.  It’s the quick stop of  farmers markets.  Enter from Mark West Springs Road.  Easy parking in the North Lot in front of the ticket office

8:30 am  12:00 noon

 

 

 

 

Read More...

“What jumps out most is the abundance of different types of fruits. Many of the stalls offer free samples and everything we tasted was sweet and fragrant. We ended up with nectarines, peaches, strawberries, and blackberries.”  read more from Beantown musings.

Added to the peaches, plums,nectarines, strawberries, raspberries. blackberries apples and pears are now appearing in the market.

Asian Pears from DeSantis Farm Wednesday and Saturday market

Apples and Pears from Ridgeview Farm Wednesday only

Photos by Elinor Burnside

Read More...

Got the mid-week- bored- blues?  the perfect-pick-me-up is the Wednesday morning market at Luther Burbank Center for the Arts.

Right now you could call it the  Bacon, Lettuce and Tomato sandwich market.    The long torturous wait for local tomatoes is over and now it is time for the BLT

Outdoor tomatoes grown in Sonoma County are here all varieties from early girls to heirloom.     Amazing bacon is available from Dream Catcher Ranch and The Windsor Green Grocer.   Full Circle Bakery has the perfect bread for your BLT – no matter what that choice is.    And while lettuce is often treated as just an accessory, we disagree and think it needs to be crisp and crunchy.  Find your perfect lettuce at Min-Hee Garden.  There are lots of varieties of lettuce in market now.

If you’d rather have someone else make your BLT – we nominate the Windsor Green Grocer.  We believe his BLT belongs in the Sandwich Hall of Fame.  And you can have it during BLT season at the Wednesday morning market.

If you are not a fan of bacon- skip the b and add any number of wonderful seasonal options – cucumbers, gypsy peppers, or try a slice of  perfectly ripe peach!

The Wednesday market has duck eggs, chicken eggs, coffee beans, coffee, coffee drinks, pastries, bread, jams, condiments, beef, duck, pork, bison, salmon, halibut, cod,mushrooms – varieties of fresh and died, honey, beeswax products,seasonal produce and fruit .   Wednesday only vendor Ridgeview Farm has the most beautiful seasonal bouquets and full bunches of zinnias.

There are also handcrafted soaps, unique jewelry and items crafted from old silverware, and beautiful hand-sewn napkins, shirts and more.

 

Current Wednesday Vendors

 

Run Around Brew

Edgeworks Knife Sharpening   every other week

Full Circle Bakery

Waterhorse Ridge Jams and More

Mi Fiesta   Tamales, enchiladas salsas etc

Vicki Kemp napkins, clothing crocheted sweaters

Willow Designs handcrafted jewelry, aprons, scarves

Gaga Café perfect cup of coffee and beans plus other drinks

Garden Wild handcrafted artisan soaps and crèmes

Carson’s Catch smoked salmon on Wed

Salmon Creek Ranch duck, duck eggs, beef

Redel flavored almonds   every other week

Dream Catcher Ranch   — pork, lamb, bison

Windsor Green Grocer   farm market breakfasts  THE BLT

Redwood Empire Farm  seasonal produce

Sebastopol Berry  berries and more berries

Beet Generation   seasonal produce

Hector’s Honey  honey, beeswax products and seasonal produce

DeSantis  fruit, nuts, dried herbs

Armstrong Valley seasonal produce

Bohemian Well Being fresh and dried mushrooms  The best selection in Sonoma Couunty

Ridgeview    Seasonal produce and flwoers

Min-hee Gardens   Seasonal produce, dried peppers, pepper plants, garden stakes

EGB Fruit   Seasonal fruit and nuts

Patch   Seasonal produce

Read More...