Looking for something to perk up your love life?

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Of course the market has oysters and chocolate but there’s a lot more choices to spark up your love life

 Almonds  You should be nuts about almonds! Although they don’t look particularly sexy (although almond-shaped eyes certainly do), they have been regarded as fertility symbols throughout antiquity. And we suppose, there’s something about these dry little nuts that recalls, well, testes. The aroma of almonds supposedly arouses passion in females — or so thought the poets and scribes of bygone eras. French writer Alexandre Dumas, the author of The Count of Monte Cristo, dined on almond soup every night before meeting his mistress. And Samson wooed Delilah with these tasty nuts, which lower cholesterol and provide abundant doses of vitamin E, magnesium and fiber to improve your general well-being. So you can keep going, and going, and going…

Eggs is are one of the most ancient fertility symbols.   Eggs are high in B6 and B5, which help you balance hormone levels and fight stress. Raw chicken eggs eaten before sex are considered to enhance one’s libido. But we’re talking eggs of all sorts, fish or fowl. Think of the way caviar gently bursts in your mouth or the delicacy of little darling quail eggs.

Celery: This crunchy, aromatic vegetable serves as a flavor base for soups and stews in cuisines around the world. It is also high in essential nutrients necessary for great sex, and it contains two chemicals — androsterone and adrostenol — which serve as a sexual attractant when ingested. If that’s not enough to get you drinking your Glowing Green Smoothie every day, then consider this: celery also makes you more physically attractive.

6.Garlic: It may not make your breath smell all that great (but is it weird I like the smell on my hands after chopping it?), but garlic contains allicin, which increases blood flow. The result may be improved stamina and sexual energy.

 

Avocado: This silky, mild fruit has a reputation as an aphrodisiac extending back to ancient Aztec times. In fact, the Aztecs called the avocado tree “Ahuacuatl,” which translates to “testicle tree.” Slice half an avocado and eat it alone or as part of a tossed green salad.

Chili peppers: The capsaicin in peppers heats up the body and increases blood flow. They also cause the brain to release endorphins, which are a feel-good chemical. Along with the internal effects leading to sexual desire, they have temporary external effects that cause the outer appearance of sexual desire, such as flushed skin and swollen lips. This creates a powerful one-two punch that just may cause sexual desire, and many cultures throughout history have used peppers as an aphrodisiac. Sprinkle cayenne on avocados, or add a little to zip up soups and stir-fries.

Honey: Rich in B vitamins, organic raw honey supports testosterone production, which can increase desire. It also contains the boron used in estrogen production, which is important for female desire. Use honey to sweeten a cup of tea. Be sure to purchase local if possible and from an ethical source.

Carrots: It may be the shape that does it for some people, but carrots also contain vitamins that are important in hormone production.

 Pomegranates: The seeds of this luscious red fruit improve blood flow and are rumored to increase genital sensitivity.

Red wine: In moderation, red wine increases blood flow, relaxes you, and lowers inhibitions. Have a few ounces of red wine, but don’t overdo it.

Arugula: Ancient Romans used this peppery, leafy green vegetable as an aphrodisiac. Along with aphrodisiac properties, arugula promotes digestion and is a great source of vitamins A and C. Add a little arugula to your salad greens.

 Chocolate: Pure, dark chocolate has a centuries old reputation as an aphrodisiac. Chocolate contains phenylethylamine (PEA), which stimulates the same hormone your body releases during sex. It also sparks dopamine production in the brain. It doesn’t take much. Try a square or two of low-sugar, vegan dark chocolate.

Onions: Have been attributed aphrodisiacal properties, since prehistoric times. They are mentioned in many classic Hindu texts on the art of making love, and were the most used aphrodisiac in ancient Greece, as well as being frequently included as an ingredient in Roman and Arab recipes. Celibate Egyptian priests were not allowed to eat onions because of their potential effects, and in France, newlyweds were served onion soup on the morning after their wedding night to restore their libido.

Onion, as well as garlic, contains the amino acid alliin and the related allicin (CH2=CH-CH2-SO-CH2-CH=CH2). Alliin, which is devoid of any odour or taste, can be transformed into allicin by the enzyme allinase. Whenever an onion (or garlic) is crushed this enzyme is released from the plant tissue and starts to enact the transformation. It is allicin which causes the “true” garlic odour. No aphrodisiacal properties have (yet) been demonstrated, but the compound makes a good antibiotic.

Oysters  These mouthwatering mollusks are the classic aphrodisiac. And, there’s research to support it: raw oysters are very high in zinc, which raises sperm and testosterone production, thus increasing libido. Like some fish, oysters contain omega-3 fatty acids, considered to increase one’s overall well-being and even fight depression. They are also a source of dopamine. No wonder Casanova ate 50 raw oysters every day.

Shiitake: The shiitake mushroom, Lentinula edodes, consists of large, tawny, parasol-shaped caps with a cream-colored inside and a delicious smoky flavor. It has a reputation of being a useful aphrodisiac even when eaten alone, but especially in combination with game.

Strawberries: They’re shaped like a heart, they’re red and they’re juicy. To get newlyweds in the mood, cold strawberry soup was served to couples before their honeymoon, according to an old French tradition. Ancient Romans believed eating strawberries increased sexual appetite, and designated the fruit as a symbol of Venus, the Roman goddess of love.