Sep

30

2010

A feast for the eyes


Ridgeview Farm and Ortiz Bros. bring beauty to the Wednesday market. Beautiful, long-lasting seasonal bouquets are available at great prices.

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Sabrina Kraus of Blue Moon Foods received a double gold (unanimous verdict of the judges.) Sabrina is shown here purchasing Ollaberries from the Sebastopol Berry Farm

McClelland’s Dairy European Style Organic Artisan Butter won double gold for their salted cow’s butter.

A new category added to this year’s competition was Professional Dairy, which includes cheese, butter and yogurt. Best of Show Dairy went to Spring Hill Jersey Cheese of Petaluma for its Peppercorn Goat Farmstead Cheese.

Harvest Fair Website

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Sep

28

2010

WOW’s BIG BITE

Worth Our Weight -WOW- is a culinary apprentice program selling fresh pastries at the Saturday market. Guy Fieri gave them a mobile cart to make markets and other events easier to work

WOW!

Link to PD Story on the WOW featured on Food Networks Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives

Learn more about WOW from another PD article.

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Sep

24

2010

Dominique’s Pies

Dominique’s sold 20 pies in a little over an hour during the Gravenstein Festival.
What makes her pies so popular? One customer swooned as he discussed the crust “Melts in your mouth…and then he whispered.”.better than my mother’s” paused and said
‘and my grandmother’s too.”

Each pie comes in a reusable glass pie pan.

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Sep

22

2010

Look what you missed at the Wed market





The Wednesday Market is the perfect place to come and chat with the farmers and vendors. All the same great produce and Dreamcatcher for pork, lamb and goat and Triple T has poultry. There is always a place to sit and enjoy the music and a cup of coffee. You can get olive oil –save by bringing your own bottle.
There are flowers,baked goods, chocolates and a wide variety of seasonal fruits and vegetables and more. If you want the freshest and best –the Wednesday market is the place for you.

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The market is bursting with cool and hot weather crops. There are peaches, melons and berries but there are also cauliflowers, potatoes, and winter squashes.

The Patch will have tomatoes through Thanksgiving. Crescent Moon’s beautiful peppers are just starting to be available -they are next to wonderful fragrant melons. The first shelling beans are also at market, Crescent Moon’s Cherokee Trail of Tears purple shelling beans.

It’s not too early to think about holiday gifts. The artisans at the market have wonderful choices. Willow Design had beautiful, warm and snuggly knit scarves and clever jewelry. She has some especially nice things for children. She also has fruit and vegetable theme pieces.

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Sep

20

2010

Tomato Festival 2010




There is a tomato festival every week during tomato season. This week the fun was organized.

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Sep

09

2010

Tomato Festival September 18th




The Santa Rosa Farmers Market 2010 Tomato Festival is September 18th. But you can have your own festival with all the beautiful tomatoes in market right now.

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Sep

02

2010

Fresh Eggs at the market




The Press Democrat’s Diane Peterson visited the market to talk about eggs.

Even if there wasn’t a salmonella scare, the fresh eggs from the market are worth the effort to get them. Compare supermarket eggs with farm fresh eggs: everything is better. -the color, the taste and the way they cook.

Plus as with everything else at the market, you have a choice. A couple of the vendors raise Araucanas an egg with a different taste. The shells are pastel colors.

Eggs must be from their own farm and certified by the County.

Triple T also carries duck eggs and from time to time other interesting eggs. (no Ostrich yet) Triple T’s eggs are organic.

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Sep

02

2010

Egg Crisis

“We like to think of our food as being produced on small, healthy, local farms. The food industry knows this, and encourages our misperception by marketing eggs under brands such as “Farm Fresh” and “Sunshine.” But in reality there’s nothing fresh or sunny about our domestic egg production.

Ninety-five percent of eggs are produced on a handful of massive factory farms. These farms aren’t the scenic landscapes you see printed on labels or shown in commercials. They are huge industrial wastelands.

Wright County Egg, one of the two factory farms responsible for the current salmonella scandal, has 7.5 million egg-laying chickens crammed together so closely in battery cages that the birds can’t even stretch their wings. The chickens often live in their own bacteria-breeding excrement, and never see the light of day.

In response to the unsanitary conditions of factory egg farms, The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently issued new egg guidelines that would beef up safety standards. This is a step in the right direction, but the problems we have with egg production are just a microcosm of the broader problems of our industrial food system.

In the short term, what we really need is comprehensive food security bill that mandates more frequent inspections of factory farms and gives the FDA the tools to prevent deadly and costly food outbreaks before they ever happen.

The U.S. house passed such a food safety bill more than a year ago, but it has since stalled in the Senate. The egg recall has given this bill renewed attention, and we need to take advantage of this growing pressure for reform. Join us in calling on the Senate to pass a food safety bill when it returns after Labor Day.

In the long term, we hope this outbreak and recall helps hatch a broader movement for a safe and healthy alternative to our industrial food system. To learn more about the movement for local, healthy, sustainable food, check out the Sustainable Food cause on Change.org.

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